I²C (Inter-Integrated Circuit)

You are here

08 June
0
  0

I²C (Inter-Integrated Circuit)

I²C (Inter-Integrated Circuit), pronounced I-squared-C or I-two-C, is a multi-master, multi-slave, packet switched, single-ended, serial computer bus invented by Philips Semiconductor (now NXP Semiconductors). It is typically used for attaching lower-speed peripheral ICs to processors and microcontrollers in short-distance, intra-board communication. Alternatively, I²C is spelled I2C (pronounced I-two-C) or IIC (pronounced I-I-C).
Since October 10, 2006, no licensing fees are required to implement the I²C protocol. However, fees are still required to obtain I²C slave addresses allocated by NXP.

SMBus, defined by Intel in 1995, is a subset of I²C, defining a stricter usage. One purpose of SMBus is to promote robustness and interoperability. Accordingly, modern I²C systems incorporate some policies and rules from SMBus, sometimes supporting both I²C and SMBus, requiring only minimal reconfiguration either by commanding or output pin use.
I²C uses only two bidirectional open-drain lines, Serial Data Line (SDA) and Serial Clock Line (SCL), pulled up with resistors. Typical voltages used are +5 V or +3.3 V, although systems with other voltages are permitted.
The I²C reference design has a 7-bit or a 10-bit (depending on the device used) address space.Common I²C bus speeds are the 100 kbit/s standard mode and the 10 kbit/s low-speed mode, but arbitrarily low clock frequencies are also allowed. Recent revisions of I²C can host more nodes and run at faster speeds (400 kbit/s Fast mode, 1 Mbit/s Fast mode plus or Fm+, and 3.4 Mbit/s High-Speed mode). These speeds are more widely used on embedded systems than on PCs. There are also other features, such as 16-bit addressing.
Note the bit rates are quoted for the transactions between master and slave without clock stretching or other hardware overhead. Protocol overheads include a slave address and perhaps a register address within the slave device, as well as per-byte ACK/NACK bits. Thus the actual transfer rate of user data is lower than those peak bit rates alone would imply. For example, if each interaction with a slave inefficiently allows only 1 byte of data to be transferred, the data rate will be less than half the peak bit rate.
The maximal number of nodes is limited by the address space and also by the total bus capacitance of 400 pF, which restricts practical communication distances to a few meters. The relatively high impedance and low noise immunity require a common ground potential, which again restricts practical use to communication within the same PC board or a small system of boards.

 

 

Latest From Blog

IoT: Security and Privacy
28 August 2017 | 0 comments
Two key IoT issues, which are also intertwined, are security and privacy: the data IoT devices store and work with needs to be safe from hackers, so as not to have sensitive data exposed to third parties.
[Read more]
IoT: Summary
25 August 2017 | 0 comments
The Internet of Things (or shortened ‘IoT’) is a hot topic in today’s world which carries extraordinary significance in socio-economic and technical aspects of everyday life.
[Read more]
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

About

“ReadyDAQ provides a customizable LabVIEW solution which is both time saving and affordable”. 

 

The team – ReadyDAQ has a dedicated team of physicists, electrical engineers, and programmers who work to provide a data acquisition solution for any project in different difficulty levels.

CONTACT INFO

  • Address: Matam - Scientific Industrial park, Building 23      Haifa, Israel
  • Phone: +972 72 250 5555
  • Mail: info@ReadyDAQ.com